New Horizons Golf Approach
I n n o v a t i v e  C o a c h i n g  F o r  G o l f e r s
Copyright 2017 Ed Tischler / New Horizons Golf Approach. All rights reserved.
BioSwing Dynamics
BioSwing Dynamics Founders Mike Adams & E.A. Tischler
BioSwing Dynamics Instructor
Certification Levels & Curriculum
Level Three:
Understanding and employing the influences of the 1) Top of the Backswing Plane, 2) Torque System,   
3) Arc Management, 4) Axis of Symmetry, and 5) Kinetic Power Sources.


1) Top of the Backswing Plane
Low, Mid and High Track Options
The Pelvic Pivot Axis feature address how the lower body
pivots.  The main influence is the distribution of weight
throughout the body.  Some people have more mass on the
left side of the body, some on the right and some more
evenly distributed.  The length of each leg in relations to
each other and spinal curvature can also influence the lower
body axis alignment.
The Trail Arm Action identifies the alignment of the trail
arm throughout the delivery process based on the golfer's
biomechanical design.  Some golfers have the forearm
facing more upward (Under Option), some more sideways
(Side-On Option), and some more downward (On-top
Option).
Golfers that own the On-Top Trail Arm Action will use a
Covering Lever Delivery Action.  Those golfers will extend
more downward through the ball and feel they are more
On-Top of the ball through impact.
These golfers also begin their delivery action when the
lead arm is parallel to the ground in the downswing and the
delivery is completed when the full extension is achieved
some 2-3 feet past impact.  The extension is therefore
pointed more downward than outward.
Golfers that own the Under Trail Arm Action will use an
Extending Lever Delivery Action.  Those golfers will extend
more out toward the target, parallel to the ground past
impact.  For most they will actually extend close to parallel
left of the target.
Golfers that own the Side-On Trail Arm Action will use a
Cornering Lever Delivery Action.  Those golfers will extend
down and out at about a 45 degree angle past impact and
then feel the swing corner more around to the inside.
These golfers also begin their delivery action when both
the lead arm and the golf shaft are pointed about 45
degrees downward in the downswing, and the delivery is
completed when the full extension is pointed about 45
degrees past impact.  The extension is therefore pointed
about the same amount downward as it is outward.
These golfers also begin their delivery action as the golf
club approaches parallel to the ground in the downswing,
and the delivery is completed when the full extension is
achieved at a point parallel to the ground past impact.  For
some golfers that parallel to the ground position will be at
And for most it will actually be pointing parallel left of the
target.
Golfers that own the On-Top Trail Arm Action will use a
Stand-Up Postural Release option.  Since they begin
their delivery action sooner and extend more downward,
they use a standing up action to make room for the
more On-Top, Covering, and extending more downward
delivery.  Peter Senior is a good example of a player that
employed this Postural Release option.
Golfers that own the Side-On Trail Arm Action will use a
Post-Up Postural Release option.  Since they begin their
delivery action about halfway down in the downswing,
and their extensions are directed down and out equally
they need to make a moderate amount of room through
impact.  To do that they are posting up on the lead leg
through impact and the upper body begins posturing up
to make room through impact and into the extension.  
Once the extension is achieved they finish off the
posturing up action finishing tall.
Golfers that own the Under Trail Arm Action will use a
Rotate-In Postural Release option.  Since they begin
their delivery action when the hands are about
waist-high and the shaft is approaching parallel to the
ground in the downswing they will extend later and much
more outward. That means they need to stay in posture
longer in order for the clubhead to get to the ball.  Once
the extension is achieved they finish off the posturing up
action finishing tall.
Hip-Differential is identified by how much the
hips are open through impact.  It is actually a
arms are catching up to the hips from the top
of the backswing to impact.  As golfers develop
athleticism they all condition different ways to
apply force. And this dynamic test allows us to
understand one of the ways the golfer applies
force.
The Wrist Lever Action is define as an
action of the club through the two-handed
grip assembly.  The vertical, diagonal and
horizontal actions are performed by the
assembly as a whole as compared to the
individual actions of each wrist.  There is
also some forearm action involved as well.
Impact Linkage is a relationship between the
arms and hands and the body through impact.  
It is a structural influence that allows the golfer
to best support the delivery of the club an the
swing's energy.
With Front Impact Linkage the lead arm, hands and
club shaft tend to line up with the lead leg.  These
golfers often use a forward press action and will
tend to play with a more forward ball position than
average.
With Center Impact Linkage the hands tend to be
aligned more in-line with the sternum and the chest
tends to be a bit open.  These golfers often have
more forward shaft lean through impact either Front
or Rear Impact Linkage golfers.
With Rear Impact Linkage the hands tend to be
aligned more in-line with the rear hip pocket and
the hips tend to be fairly open through impact.
These golfers will tend to play with a ball position
more back in the stance than average.
Hip-Plane Delivery Slotters will use a down-slotting
action to align the hands in position to deliver the
clubhead in the zone designated as the Hip-Plane
Zone.  That zone is a coned area from the ball up
through the pelvis with the lower part of the zone
aligning through the tailbone and the upper line
through the navel.
cross-slotting action to align the hands in position
to deliver the clubhead in the zone designated as
the Torso-Plane Zone.  That zone is a coned area
from the ball up through the torso with the lower
part of the zone aligning through the navel and the
upper line through the bottom of the sternum.
direct slotting action to align the hands in position
to deliver the clubhead in the zone designated as
the Shoulder-Plane Zone. That zone is a coned
area from the ball up through the shoulder girdle
with the lower part of the zone aligning through the
bottom of the sternum and the upper line through
the base of the skull.
Clearing is basically the action of returning the
rearend on the invisible wall that instructors
often talk about in instruction.  Technically it
roll is to establish postural angles in the
downswing so that the arms and club can slot
and link up properly.  

Front Hip Clear golfers will use an action of
rotating the front hip so that the front glute will
be pushed back on the wall while the rearend
as a whole returns to the wall.  These golfers
will also use Front Impact Linkage.
The Center Hip Clear options uses a pushing
back of both hips equally to create the
postural angles and get the rearend back on
the wall.  Sam Snead and Tiger Woods are
good examples of golfers that used this
action.  These golfers also use Center Impact
Linkage.
Rear Hip Clear golfers keep the rear glute
pinned backward as the hips turn during the
downswing.  The hips will tend to glide along
the wall as the hips clear and the arms link up
with the body.  These golfers will use Rear
Impact Linkage.
Thanks to Dr. David Wright for his research in core dynamics,
balance and how it's dynamics relate to the structural influences.  
Dr. Wright has also contributed much in the way of Power Angles,
Grip Sizing, Stance Width and Line of Force research.  He as
contributed greatly to our understandings of organizing dynamic
influences that allow the structural influences to work more
naturally together.

The picture to the left shows the full region of what is generally
accepted as the Core.  In general terms it ranges from the bottom
of the pelvis ot the top of the shoulder girdle.  However technically
it can be argued that it involves the glutes and thighs at the lower
end and up into the jaw at the upper end.
regions of the core.  They are designated as the Lower (Hip), Middle
(Torso) and Upper (Shoulder) regions.  The activity of those regions
relate to the Delivery Plane Slot Zones.  With that in mind, golfers that
are built to use the Lower (Hip) region will be Hip-Plane Slotters.  
Those that use the Middle (Torso) region will be Torso-Plane Slotters
and those that use the Upper (Shoulder) region will be Shoulder-Plane
Slotters.
With further investigation we will learn that each of the general core
regions have 3 sub regions. There are 9 regions in all.  Regions 1, 2,
and 3 make up the Lower (Hip) Zone.  Regions 4, 5, and 6 make up
the Middle (Torso) Zone.  And regions 7, 8, and 9 make up the Upper
(Shoulder) Zone.

Each of the Zones has specific stance widths that allow the golfer to
find the balance needed to naturally engage that core region
throughout the swing.  The lower regions use more rearward balance
which feels more in the heels though is actually just behind the center
of the arches.  The upper regions use a more forward balance
alignment with feels in the balls of the feet yet are actually where the
balls and arc meet.  The middle regions use a more central balance
alignment.
The picture above left shows a delivery alignment that is in the upper part Hip Zone.  This slotting action relates
to the number 3 core region in the picture of the 9 core regions above.  The picture above center show a
delivery alignment that is in the middle part of the Torso Zone, and relates to the number 5 core region in the
picture of the 9 core regions above.  The picture above right shows a delivery alignment that is in the lower
Shoulder Zone and it correlates to the number 7 core region in the picture of the 9 core regions above.
The Top of the Backswing Plane is simply
identified by how the lead are relates to the
shoulders at the top of the backswing.  If the
lead arm is below the shoulder line then the
golfer is employing a Low-Track Option.  If the
lead arm is aligned through the shoulder line
then the golfer is using a Mid-Track Option.  If
the golfers are is aligned above the shoulder
line then the golfer is using a High-Track
Options.  Each golfer can be screened to
understand which fits his or her design.
Some golfers can only get a minimal amount of
separation between the rotation of the pelvis
separation between the rotation of the pelvis
separation between the rotation of the pelvis
and that of the thorax.  These golfer will use a
and that of the thorax.  These golfer will use a
generous rotation of the hips during the
backswing without trying to create much of an
X-factor at all.  As a side note much of the
torque we are actually using is that of torque in
our ground force activity.
Upper Torque golfers are able to naturally
achieve a large differential between the
rotation of the thorax and the pelvis.  They are
able to do so without putting undue stress on
the spine.  These golfer will have somewhat of
a restricted hip turn and a large shoulder turn.
Full Torque golfers will have a moderate
degree of separation between the rotations of
will tend to turn the pelvis moderately and the
shoulders fully.  They will tend to have
backswings that travel past parallel at the top
of the backswing.
Narrow-wide golfers will perform a backswing
that has less width than the downswing.  Tom
Watson is a good example of a golfer that
used this option.
Deep-Deep golfers will have about the same
amount of width in the backswing as they have
in the downswing.  However they will also
create more depth than average.
Wide-Narrow golfers with use more width in the
backswing with a much narrower downswing.  
This is the classic image.  Davis Love III is a
good example of a golfer that uses this option.
As the thoracic cage rotates and the upper
spine torques some golfers will look like they
are rotating more around the sternum than the
spine.  These golfers are built to move this way
and are often accused of having a reverse
pivot.
As the thoracic cage rotates and the upper are
rotating in a very centered and symmetrical
manner.
As the thoracic cage rotates and the upper
spine torques some golfers will look like they
are rotating more around the spine.  With
these golfers the head moves more behind the
ball as they complete their backswing.
Thanks again to Dr. Scott Lynn for his research in
ground force patterns and for joining us in BioSwing
Dynamics to understand the truths of what is
happening with golfers of differing biomechanical
make-ups.

Throughout our studies it has become clear that all
golfers have a dominant source of power when it
comes to the Kinetic Sequence.  The Kinetic
Sequence involves the combined use of Horizontal,
Torque and Vertical ground forces.  Every golfer
uses them all to some degree, however one of them
is their dominant force and that means it is used to
a degree that is well above average.
Those that use Horizontal Force to a degree
above average are designated to use Glide, or
be a Glider.  Golfers also describe the action
that produces the ground force as using
Drive.  That is because they often feel like they
are driving off the rear foot.  Whatever the
case these golfers feel a definite rearward
push through the feet.
Creating Torque in the ground force pattern is
done through using Force Couples.  Many golfers
simply feel like they corkscrew their feet into the
ground.  They may feel that action in one foot, in
both feet at the same time, or even in one foot than
they other.
Those golfers using Torque as the main power
source are designated to use Spin or be Spinners.  
Many of these golfers describe themselves as being
more Rotaters or Rotary golfers.
Golfers that use Vertical Force as the main power
source are designated to use Launch or be
Launchers.  These golfers are often called jumpers
because for some their heels actually come off the
ground.  However, many golfers use Vertical Force
as their primary source without the heels leaving
the ground.
Most of the golfers that are considered long
use two of the Kinetic sources above the
average levels.  Gary Woodland is an example
of a golfer that does so using both Horizontal
and Torque above average.  Thus we describe
him as a Double-Dipper that uses both Glide
and Spin.
Some Double-Dippers use both Torque and
Launch above average.  JB Holmes is an
example of one of these golfers.
Some Double-Dippers use the Horizontal and
Vertical sources above average.  Dr Scott Lynn
is an example of one of these golfers.  He is
more than just a biomechanist, he is also a
very good golfer.
Some golfers are able to hit the Trifecta.  That
means they are able to use all three sources
above average.above average.
The Kinetic Sequence we look for is for Horizontal
to peak first, then Torque, then Vertical, will the
Vertical Force peaking a little bit before Impact.  
Now, many good players are successful while using
different sequences, however every time we
encounter one of those sequences and work with
golfers to improve there power output we find that
they end up with the Kinetic Sequence of
Horizontal, Torque, then Vertical.  We have also
identified screens that match up with each of the
sources allowing us to more easily identify which
sources the golfers will use as their dominant and
secondary sources.
If you want to learn more about the structural influences within the BioSwing Dynamics Approach then we
suggest that you purchase and study E.A. Tischler's Secrets Of Owning Your Swing book series.  There are
presently 3 volumes with a 4th in the making.  The first books overviews the 12 structural feature/options in
detail.  Volume 2 covers the structural influences address in Level One of the certification process.  Volume 3
covers the structural influences in Level Two of the Certification process and Volume 4 will cover those in
Level Three of the Certification process.  Volumes 2-4 cover screenings and applications.
1)  Pelvic Pivot Axis (Posting/Swing Anchor)
2) Trail Arm Action (Originally Swing Path)
3) Lever Delivery Action
Covering Action (Using On-Top Trail Arm Action)
Cornering Action (Using Side-On Trail Arm Action)
Extending Action (Using Under Trail Arm Action)
4) Postural Release
Stand-Up Action (Used with On-Top Trail Arm Action)
Post-Up Action (Used with Side-On Trail Arm Action)
Rotate-In Action (Used with Under Trail Arm Action)
5) Hip-Differential - Dynamic Influence
How open are the hips at impact due to dynamic conditioning?
Level Two:
Understanding and employing the influences of the 1) Wrist Lever Action, 2)Swing Linkage, 3) Downswing
Delivery Plane, 4) Clearing Action, and 5) Core Region.


1) Wrist Lever Action
Vertical, Horizontal & Diagonal Hinging (With the grip established)
2) Swing Linkage
Front, Center & Rear Options (hands to body alignment at Impact)
Front Impact Linkage
Center Impact Linkage
Rear Impact Linkage
3) Downswing Delivery Plane
Hip-Plane Slot, Torso-Plane Slot, Shoulder Plane Slot Options

Hip-Plane Slotting
Torso-Plane Slotting
Shoulder Plane Slotting
4) Clearing Action
Front, Center and Rear Clear Options

Front Hip Clearing Option
Center Hip Clearing Option
Rear Hip Clearing Option
5) Core Regions
Pelvic Zone, Torso Zone, Shoulder Zone
2) Torque System
Lower, Full and Upper Options

Lower Torque Option
Upper Torque Option
Full Torque Option
3) Arc Management
Narrow-Wide, Deep-Deep and Wide-Narrow Options

Narrow-Wide Option
Deep-Deep Option
Wide-Narrow Option
4) Upper Body Pivot Axis
Sternum-Line, Center-Line and Spine-Line Options

Sternum-Line Option
Center-Line Option
Spine-Line Option
5) Kinetic Power Sources
Horizontal (Glide), Torque (Spin) and Vertical (Launch) Options
(Thanks to Dr. Scott Lynn for the slides in this section)

Horizontal (Glide) as the Primary Source
Torque (Spin) as the Primary Source
Vertical (Launch) as the Primary Source
Horizontal-Torque (Glide-Spin) Double-Dipper
Torque-Vertical (Spin-Launch) Double-Dipper
Horizontal-Vertical (Glide-Launch) Double-Dipper
The Trifecta Horizontal-Torque-Vertical (all above average)
Understanding the Kinetic Sequence
Level Four:
Understanding 3D technologies, assessments and techniques: including Ground Force and Kinetic
sequence, Kinematic sequence, Dynamic Balance and Dynamic Posture, Resisters and Releasers, along
with Impact dynamics and launch characteristics.

Ground Force
3D Body Analysis
Impact & Launch Dynamics
Additional Technology

If you have any questions regarding New Horizons Golf Approach please contact
EA Tischler at (408)203-7599, or email your questions to EA Tischler
newhorizonsgolfer@yahoo.com.
Level Six:
Inner Game and Playing Management.  Organizing your Method of Play, Performing in the Flow by
developing a routine that leads you into the Zone.  Includes goal setting and understanding strength
and weakness.  We also address statistical analysis.
Level Five:
Stroke Saving Techniques.  With a focus on building a technique that matches each golfer's
biomechanical design, while developing a repeatable technique.  Areas of focus include Putting, Up &
Down around the green, Bunker Play, Wedge Play.
Stroke Techniques
This section will be completed later in 2017
This section will be completed later in 2017
BioSwing Dynamics Myelinator
The photo above shows the BioSwing Dynamics
Myelinator Station that E.A. Tischler has at Olympia
Fields CC.
Above show the current display that the golfer
looks at while training.
BioSwing Dynamics Educational Events:     There are a variety of Educational Events
available to learn more about BioSwing Dynamics.  The first type are simple seminars and
presentations that are given at events like PGA coaching summits.  Those are typically 45
minutes to 3 hours
(These events do not count towards certification.  We often have instructors say they have been
to 2 or 3 educational events and it turns out they were just seminars or presentations.  Their main purpose are to simply
overview concepts we cover in BioSwing Dynamics)
. Then we have 1-Day Certification Course designed
specifically for each level of a the Certification process
(These are specifically designed to prepare
instructors for the testing process.  We also do testing at these events for those instructors ready to be tested)
.  2-Day
Workshop
(These have a variety of presenters that cover topics that from Level 1-4 of the certification process).  
3-Day Major Educational Events (These events cover updated information, new research topics and ongoing
education information)
.

To become a
Level One Certified Instructor you must attend 2  Major Educational Events or
3 Educational Events that are made up of 1-day workshops, 2-day Certification Courses and a
3-Day Major Educational Events.  Our suggestion would be to attend one of each to truly
prepare yourself for testing.  Another option is to attend either a 2-Day Course or a 3-Day
course and then 2 one day workshops.  At the second workshop you will be ready for testing.  
Our goal is to get you truly ready for being Certified and to guarantee the quality of your
education.

To become a
Level Two Certified Instructor you will need to attend two educational events -
one 1-Day Workshop and either a 2-Day or 3-Day event.  Keep in mind that those are
additional events beyond those you attended in Level One.  Many Instructors decide to attend
additional course simply to gain that confidence that they are truly prepared

To become a
Level Three Certified Instructor you will need to attend two educational events
- one 1-Day Workshop and either a 2-Day or 3-Day event.  Keep in mind that those are
additional events beyond those you attended in Level One & Two.

Two become a
Level Four Certified Instructor you will first need to take Dr David Wright's
Wright Balance Certification for Stance Width.  Additionally you will need to take specific course
designed to improve your knowledge of using 3D analysis technology in your teaching.  There
will also be specific courses in determining the golfer's dynamic patterns and techniques.

Two become a
Level Five Certified Instructor you will need to attend at least two
Educational Events designed specifically for coaching short game skills in a customized manner
for each golfers Biomechanical Design.


To become a
Level Six Certified Instructor you will need to attend at least two multiple day
Education Events designed specifically coaching golfers in the process of performance through
improving focal skills, routines, commitments and other Inner and Mental Game topics.

Once your are Certified in all 6 Levels you can become a Master Level Instructor.
Upcoming BioSwing Dynamics Educational Events
June 2017

September 2017

BioSwing Dynamics Level One
1-Day Certification Course
Olympia Fields Country Club.
$495 per Instructor
Monday September - TBA
9am-5pm



BioSwing Dynamics Level Two
1-Day Certification Course
Olympia Fields Country Club.
 
$495 per Instructor
September - TBA
9am-5pm
Level One:
Understanding and employing the influences of the 1) Pelvic Pivot Axis (Posting/Swing Anchor), 2) Trail Arm
Action, 3) Lever Delivery Action, 4) Postural Release, and 5) Hip-Chest Differential
July 2017

BioSwing Dynamics/Myelinator
Global Summit at
Olympia Fields Country Club.
Monday July 31st &
Tuesday August 1st
9am-5pm
$175 per person




Here's a link to the BioSwing
Dynamics/Myelinator Page with
Summit information on the
Ownmyswing.com website:
Global Summit Information


Below is a link to the Golf Wire Press
Release on Tuesday June 20th, 2017:
Press Release



If you are already an instructor
within the BioSwing Dynamics
Network of Instructors you can sign-
up for the summit here for the
discounted rate of $145
October 2017

BioSwing Dynamics 2-Day Workshop
Padova, Italy - Golf Della Montecchia
October 2nd-3rd
Here's a link:



BioSwing Dynamics 2-Day Workshop
France - Golf National
October 5th-6th
Here's a link:





BioSwing Dynamics Level One
1-Day Certification Course
Olympia Fields Country Club
 
$495 per Instructor
Monday October - TBA
9am-5pm



BioSwing Dynamics Level Two
1-Day Certification Course
Olympia Fields CC  
$425 per Instructor
October - TBA
9am-5pm
August 2017

July 31st and August 1st 2017

E.A. Tischler will be hosting the first
BioSwing Dynamics/Myelinator Global
Summit.

The Summit is designed for forward thinking
and business minded golf professionals.  

The goal of the summit is to introduce a new
game changing platform for the way golf
instructors train students and engage in
their business.

We have created a BioSwing
Dynamics/Myelinator Ecosystem that brings
together innovative technologies into a
training and business platform that can be
used anywhere in the world.

The Ecosystem integrates the Myelinator,
FocusBand, S2M force plates, BioSwing
Dynamics Screens and Training Protocols,
along with the BioSwing
Dynamics/Myelinator Cloud and App to make
training and doing business more
accessible.

For the Student they can be certain they will
be training perfectly.  For the golf instructor
they will be able enjoy a "Revenue Sharing
Platform" while knowing their students are
training properly.
November 2017

BioSwing Dynamics Level One
Instructors Training at
Olympia Fields Country Club.
$495 per Instructor  
Monday November - TBA
9am-5pm



BioSwing Dynamics Level Two
1-Day Certification Course
Olympia Fields Country Club.
 
$495 per Instructor
November - TBA
9am-5pm
These are the educational events that count toward becoming a certified instructor.
BioSwing Dynamics Coaches:
Click on any of the pictures to see the coaches page for
information on these coaches and others.
MASTER INSTRUCTORS & FOUNDERS:












E.A. Tischler












Mike Adams
MASTER INSTRUCTORS & FOUNDERS:
Click on any of the coaches pictures to open the dedicated coaches page so
that you can learn more about the coaches, and possibly find one near you.
Click on the pictures to link to their websites in a new browser window.
Click on the pictures to link to their websites in a new browser window.
Click on the pictures to link to their websites in a new browser window.
Click on the pictures to link to their websites in a new browser window.
https://smart2move.com
To begin your studies in preparation for becoming a Level Six BioSwing Dynamics Certified Instructor
we suggest you study the books below.
Technology used to Master the aspects of the Zone experience:
FocusBand:
Opti-International:
ThinQ Golf:
https://smart2move.com
BioSwing Dynamics is an approach to learning and coaching golf that was founded by Mike Adams and E.A. Tischler.   
Though they founded the approach they have also made it their commitment to work with many of the leading
coaches, instructors, scientists, biomechanists, fitness experts, and doctors that use their expertise to help us all better
understand the truth about what works, why it works and which golfers it best fits.  With over 30 years of research
each, Mike and E.A. have identified 12 structural influences that help identify why golfers have unique and specific
patterns within their swing techniques.  Beyond the structural influences they have also identified a variety of dynamic
patterns and have been categorizing which patterns best fit each golfer.  Though BioSwing Dynamics also
acknowledges issues of functionality within biomechanics we typically differ to those fitness experts that we have
partnered with to deal with functional issues.Throughout their careers both Mike Adams and E.A. Tischler have worked
with Medical Experts, Physicists, Biomechanists and Fitness Experts to help understand which patterns are valid and
which ones failed to stand up to scientific review.  With their help we strive to provide the best possible information with
regard to the patterns we have identified.  With our ongoing research we do our best to describe the tendencies we
recognize as well as the information we can definitively state as true.  

You will find a schedule of Education Events Below and a way of linking to a page dedicated to certified coaches and
how to contact them.
BioSwing Dynamics bridges the gaps between teaching, coaching and science. It takes the guesswork
out of determining how a golfer should optimally swing. It allows us to bring efficiency of motion in an
injury-free environment to the students’ golf swing.”  Mike Adams