Spine Line Axis of Symmetry Option:
Center Line Axis of Symmetry Option:
Rear Hip Clear Option:
As we study the biomechanics of the body's involvement in the golf stroke it is essential to discuss the body's balance point in the hip girdle and how it influences
the basic pivot action.  This brings us to the topics of the Pelvic Pivot Axis, Posting and Swing Anchoring.  Posting is the concept of favoring one leg or the other
during the pivot action.  You can favor your lead leg, your trail leg or be more symmetrical.  The concept of a Pelvic Pivot Axis (or Lower Body Pivot Axis) is one that
identifies the body's natural distribution of weight from lead side to trail side and addresses how the pelvis rotates around an axis that matches up with the
distribution of weight.  The concept of a Swing Anchor brings those together while adding in the head as a counter balance.

What is a Swing Anchor – The Anchoring Process

Being anchored keeps your body motion from swaying or drifting too much during the stroke.    Just like a boat uses an anchor to keep from drifting away, using a
swing anchor will minimize drifting to much.  This means swing anchor techniques facilitate centeredness and repeatability.  Swing Anchor techniques will also assist
in stacking your power components more efficiently.  If you have studied EA Tischler's book, “Stacking For Powerful Golf,” you may already understand how
stacking techniques relate to anchoring.  For those of you that are familiar with Power Stacking techniques, anchoring will help tighten up your stacking techniques.
For those of you that are unfamiliar with power stacking techniques, feel confident that beginning with anchoring biomechanics is a sound place to start.  As a
matter of fact, Anchoring is an actual biomechanical feature of the golf stroke while Power Stacking is an application.

Anchoring in golf is a means of coordinating your weight shift and rotation in as centered a manner as possible.  Golfers often drift, slide, or sway in their swings.
This is mainly because they are told to shift their weight laterally.  Too much lateral motion will slide the swing’s center of rotation, causing the bottom of the swing
arc to drift and this leads to inconsistency with your ball striking techniques.  To help keep the stroke as centered as necessary the head acts as a counterbalance
and the manner in which it does can ensure that your swing is anchored properly.  Lastly, one of the greatest benefits of using an ANCHORED SWINGING action is
its’ ability to facilitate a consistent bottom of the swing arc location; thus encouraging consistently sound impact conditions.

The main premise of anchoring is establishing a pedestal that supports your center of rotation, followed by rotating in posture so to sustain the integrity of the
pedestal and rotational center.  Simply put it means isolating a point of rotation and keeping that point as centered as possible as your body rotates during the
swing.  In sports, we call this rotary action a pivot, a pivot being an activity that isolates a central point for the activity to revolve around.  Therefore when we say that
the primary principle of anchoring is rotating in posture we are also saying that anchoring involves developing a centered pivot action, or once again a pedestal
pivot action.  To help anchor your swing properly, you will learn to synchronize your weight shift (pressure shifts) with your pivoting body.  Synchronizing those shifts
allow you to blend the rotational aspects of your swing with the use of ground force.  Keep in mind that at this point we are mainly discussing swinging techniques as
compared to Hitting or Throwing techniques.  And in that regard we are addressing using our ground forces to promote swinging techniques.  Though this
discussion is more of a dynamic technique discussion than it is a structural concern it is important to understand some of the basic influences.  As far as using the
ground we all use Horizontal, Torque and Vertical forces/pressures.  In general Throwers use the Horizontals as a main source of power, Swingers use the Torques
as a main source, and Hitters use the Verticals as a main source.  However we all use all three, and if you want to be considered as a power play then you will want
to combine two of the sources to make up your base of power.  For example, Power Throwers tend to combine the horizontals and torques.  Power Swingers tend to
combine the torques and verticals, and power Hitters tend to combine the horizontals and verticals.  Now some golfers are able to use all three for significant power
and they become the longest golfers pound for pound.  Since we are addressing Swingers for now, we will mainly be looking at the torques and verticals.  This
means that swingers learn to torque their weight shift instead of drive it laterally.  Then once the torqued force reaches the ball of the lead foot the golfer will use
that platform to post up and apply the verticals.  This is a relatively novel concept for most golfers.  It is novel because so many golfers have been convinced that
they MUST drive their weight shift laterally.  Once again the lateral drive does have it's place and we will discuss it at a later date.  

Beyond synchronizing your weight/pressure shifts with your rotation you will also learn how to counter balance the process.  Maintaining a counter balance helps
tighten up the pivoting action.  It also  helps sustain the integrity of the pedestal.  It does so by helping us maintain dynamic balance and posture as we pivot. To
counter balance the action the golfer learns to maintain a stationary head position from the start of the swing until the posture is released up toward the finish.  
Though this is a simplistic view of counter balancing the pivot it will suffice for now.  Simply realize that by establishing a constant pivot point along with a rotary
weight/pressure shift and a counter balance you will be able to maintain a truly anchored swing action; and in doing so you will create a sound platform for rotating
in posture.  

As you learn to use the Swing Anchor concept you are building a pivot with the concept of a tripod center or pedestal action.  Being that we take a stance with two
legs, our legs support our center of gravity much like a tripod supports a camera.  You can also view it as if our legs are creating a triangular pedestal designed to
hold our center of gravity in place as we rotate around it.  Being that Power of 3 Golf strives to introduce you to the biomechanics of swinging in as user friendly a
process as possible I will again refrain from a detailed discussion of the math, geometry, and physics of pivoting  with this pedestal concept.  Instead I will introduce
you to what I call the A-Frame System.  This system uses a simple triangle to view the precision of your pivoting action.  Simply keep in mind that a centered pivot
loads while rotating around your body’s best pivot point and at the same time aligns your center of gravity with your axis of rotation.  Your axis of rotation can be
described as your anchor line as far as your lower body is concerned, or your axis of symmetry as far as your upper body is concerned.  From the transition until
the point of delivery our swings store energy, and then accumulate energy.  As the swing begins delivery, energy is dynamically transferred while unwinding around
the forward support of the pedestal, and we do so while maintaining the structure of the pedestal.  Simply put this means the rotary action releases around the
forward leg.  In doing so a true swinger will continue to do so in as rotary a process as possible.  With this said, even this discussion is too technical and will be over
looked by most readers.  The point is, there exists math, geometry, and physics that explain why this type of pivot action seemingly moves from one axis of rotation
to another while actually maintaining a centered pivot action.  In general terms, the centeredness of a two-legged pedestal action can be  viewed as rotating in
posture.  And one way of viewing whether you are rotating in posture is to notice whether the triangular relationship established between your feet and your swing’s
counter balance point is maintained throughout the pivot, or at least up until the swing has delivered its’ stored energy.  OK, enough of that for now, the process will
become clear in the A-Frame  System section of this book.

To begin the anchoring process we will discover which point of rotation best fits your unique body type.  There are three possible points of rotation for pivoting your
hip girdle.  They are the left hip joint, the right hip joint and your center of gravity.  Biomechanically only one of these options is ideal for each golfer.  This is
because your body is either balanced symmetrically about the centerline of your body, or your body has more weight on one side or the other of the centerline.  

Your body’s weight distribution is organized into physiological factors and anatomical factors.  For example, some people have more muscle mass on one side of the
body than the either.  This is a physiological concern.  Though we are encouraged to condition our bodies in such a way to keep them symmetrically balanced, most
people are unable to spend the time and energy necessary to accomplish this goal.   Some golfers have more bone mass on one side of the body or the other.  For
example, your pelvis may be structured with more mass on one side or the other.  This is an anatomical concern.  As you may have already noticed, we can more
easily change the physiological factors then we can the anatomical ones. However, golfer’s anatomical factors can be changed.  For example, if a golfer has a hip
replacement there certainly will be anatomical changes.  

By the way, many professionals drift as compared to being anchored.  When playing well they either remain sufficiently anchored, or simply time the drifting action
well that week.  When playing poorly they drift in and out of their swing anchor and fail to time the drifting action.  Some players are unaware of this drift while others
actually focus on creating it.  The point to remember here is, drifting in the middle of the swing is problematic for swinging type actions.  It is problematic because the
swinging action becomes unstable while drifting.  While drifting from one point to another, the pivot action loses stability and requires a re-stabilization action before
delivering the power.  This is very hard to manage consistently.  It is much easier to maintain a more central pivot action while anchoring it with a synchronized
weight/pressure shift and a counter balance.  Also keep in mind that when we are talking about rotating in as centered a manner as possible we aren't saying that
the pivot needs to be perfectly centered.  Nor are we saying that it needs to perfectly rotate around the center of gravity of the body.  As a matter of principle the
actual center of gravity will move from side to side and up and down, even in the most centered Swing Anchor techniques.  The real key to the Swing Anchor
technique is to use an axis alignment that matches your biomechanical design and to match it up with a pedestal pivot action that suits your dynamic conditioning.

I’ve often been asked whether these concerns are too advanced for the average golfer.  People often think these concerns are more suited for the professional
golfer.  In reality, the professional golfer can get away with cheating on his or her biomechanics.  The reason being that athleticism can often compensate for a
deficiency in biomechanics.  Additionally, professional golfers train and play on daily basis giving them more opportunity to adjust for these deficiencies.  
Professional athletes are much more in tune to their bodies than recreational golfers.  Being in tune produces heightened awareness, which is used to adjust the
feel needed to compensate for biomechanical deficiencies.

The average golfer is less likely to make up for biomechanical deficiencies with athleticism.  Average golfers are also much less “golf-fit” than professional golfers.  
Studies have shown that even professional golfers that appear to be less fit are actually stronger and more flexible than the average golfer.  Being more fit also
gives the professional an added advantage when it comes to making compensations.  Now some average golfers would argue that they exercise regularly and
therefore are very fit.  General fitness is great for maintaining good health; however it is insufficient for the specific needs of sports.  Professional athletes use sport
specific training techniques specially designed to address the needs of their particular sports.  Therefore, it should be clear that professional golfers are much more
equipped to compensate for biomechanical deficiencies than the average golfer.  This being the case, the average golfer needs to be aware of his or her unique
biomechanical needs.  This gives the average golfer the best chance of maintaining a consistent swing.  With this in mind, each golfer is encouraged to identify the
pivot point that best fits his or her body type.  

In summary, the process of anchoring involves defining the best point of rotation in your pelvis, and that will tell you which post of the pedestal you will favor.  Then
we establish the pedestal to support your best point of rotation while synchronizing your weight/pressure shifts to promote a rotary action. Finally we counterbalance
the pivot with a stationary head location.  Keep in mind that only one of the three pivot point options fits your specific biomechanical needs perfectly, and the one
that fits perfectly is the one recommended to build your swing around.  
Swing Anchor - Posting - Pelvic Pivot Axis Biomechanics:
Front, Center, & Rear options
(Left) Imagine the three basic pivot points, their locations, and how you might
rotate around them in a centered manner.  In the next few sections you will learn
how to isolate each pivot point.  Then you’ll learn to anchor your pivot action
around that location. The Red Dot marks the Center Anchor Pivot Point, the
Orange Dot marks the Rear Anchor Pivot Point, and the Blue Dot marks the Front
Anchor Pivot Point.

(Below)  In the three pictures below each picture has a triangular overlay that
helps identify which anchor point the golfer has establish at address.  (Below-
Left) The the front anchor address position.  Notice how the triangle is leaning
forward.  (Below-Middle) The center anchor address position.  Notice how the
triangle is isosceles. (Below-Right) The rear anchor address position.  Notice how
the triangle is leaning rearward.  Notice how in each set-up both sides of the A-
frame triangle are aligned through their respective hip joints.  This is an important
feature of identifying the proper anchor address alignments for a golfer
employing a swinging style of golf stroke.  Also notice how the head is positioned
to the rear side of the top of each triangle.  This is a sign the golfer has the proper
secondary spine tilt angle, a key ingredient for establishing proper  postural
alignments.
Below we have provided three swing sequences.  One is a front anchor swing pattern, another is a center anchor swing
pattern, and the third is a rear anchor swing pattern.  As you view each of these patterns you will notice a triangular overlay
to help identify what pattern is being employed.  We call this the A-Frame System.  Using the A-Frames to help view what
anchor patterns are being used are very helpful in developing a truly anchored swing technique.  You will notice that front
anchor swings have an overlaying triangle that leans toward the golfers front side.  You will notice that center anchor swings
have an overlaying triangle that is an isosceles triangle.  And, you will notice that rear anchor swings have an overlaying
triangle that leans rearward.
The swing pattern to the left is an example of a training swing
used to internalize the Front Anchor swing pattern.  Once the
training swing has been performed long enough to develop a
strong habit the players actual swing begins to display the same
alignments seen in the  training swing.  1) The Front Anchor
address is established favoring the front post with a bit more
weight on the front foot than the rear foot.  2) Next preset the wrist
lever action that fits your biomechanics.  3)  Then twist around the
front anchor pivot point until turned fully and the front knee is
positioned directly under my front hip pivot point. At the top Front
Anchor golfers often fell more weight on the front foot than the
rear foot.  In most cases this is an illusion.  In fact, it is typically the
case that pressure has shifted rearward and grown dramatically
under the rear foot even though the pivot action is favoring the
front post alignment.  4) Transition and restore into the preset
position; still front anchor.  Pressure now shifts to the lead foot.  
5) From the restore position you are ready to deliver the swing’s
energy.  During delivery, you use the pressure under the weight
lead foot to post up.  6) As the swing releases into the full
extension your body continues to rotate around the front hip joint,
and your rear hip joint rotates through to align with the front hip
joint on the front side of the A-frame triangle.  This is a sign that
you have transferred energy with a pedestal pivot action.  Your
head continues to counter balance the motion through the full
extension.  7) From here fully release your posture up to the full  
follow-through.  8) Next finish off the action in a vertical posture.
The swing pattern to the left is an example of a training swing
used to internalize the Center Anchor swing pattern.  Once the
training swing has been performed long enough to develop a
strong habit the players actual swing begins to display the
same alignments seen in the  training swing.  1) The Center
Anchor address position is established with an evenly
distributed balance between both feet and posts.  2) Next
preset your wrist lever action that fits your biomechanics.  3)
Turn to the top while maintaining a centered balanced pedestal
pivot action.   Though the pedestal pivot action is centered you
will feel more pressure load under the rear foot. However you
will also have a feeling of some pressure building inside the ball
of the lead foot.  4) Transition and restore back into the preset
position; still center balance, however pressure is now moving
to the lead foot.  5) From the restored preset position you are
ready to deliver the swing’s energy.  During delivery, you use
the pressure under the lead foot to post up on the lead leg.  
Your trail knee move toward your lead knee at the same time
helping you rotate inside the A-frame triangle.  6) As the swing
fully releases into the full extension your rear hip moves in-line
with the front side of the A-frame triangle, and your head is still
counter balancing the pivot action.  7) Once the extension is
complete you allow your posture to release up to the full follow-
throw.  8)  To finish off the motion your arms return in front of
your body with the club pointing at the target.  Though center
anchor golfers release their posture to the full finish, they often
finish while leaning slightly away from the target.
The swing pattern to the left is an example of a training swing
used to internalize the Rear Anchor swing pattern.  Once the
training swing has been performed long enough to develop a
strong habit the players actual swing begins to display the
same alignments seen in the  training swing.  1) The Rear
Anchor address is established while favoring the rear post
with a bit more weight on the rear foot.  2) Next preset the
wrist lever action that fits your biomechanics.  3)  Then turn
around your rear post alignment your front shoulder is
positioned over inside of your rear foot. At the same time feel
the pressure grow under the rear foot.  4) Transition and
restore into the preset position; still rear anchor. As you do
so feel some pressure shift to the front foot  5) From the
restored preset position you are ready to deliver the swing’s
energy.  During delivery, your push off your rear foot and
onto the front foot. At the same time your rear knee moves
toward your lead knee, which helps you rotate inside the A-
frame triangle.  6) As the swing fully releases into the full
extension your rear hip moves in-line with the front side of
the A-frame triangle. Your head is still counter balancing the
pivot action.  7) Once the extension is complete allow your
posture to release up to the full follow-throw.  Notice how the
golfer's postural alignments have released out of the
triangle.  8)  To finish off the motion your arms return in front
of your body with the club pointing at the target.  In the
picture far right notice how the posture is vertical.  This is
proper finish posturing.
Torque System Biomechanics:
Lower Body, Full Body, & Upper Body options
Copyright 2009 EA Tischler - New Horizons Golf Approach. All rights reserved.

If you have any questions regarding New Horizons Golf Approach please contact
EA Tischler at (408)203-7599, or email your questions to EA Tischler
newhorizonsgolfer@yahoo.com
New Horizons Golf Approach
I n n o v a t i v e  C o a c h i n g  F o r  G o l f e r s
As we continue our study of the biomechanics related to Power we need to discuss the concept of how torque is developed
in the golf stroke.  In general, torque has been taught as a concept of "Coil" in the backstroke.  This concept was largely
popularized by Jim McLean's "X-Factor."  The basic idea is to keep the lower body quiet and then coil the shoulders above
the relatively stationary hips, then creating a differential angle between the hips and shoulders.  When viewed from above
the line through the hips crosses over the line across the shoulders and the two lines create an X.  Though this basic theory
is to create the differential in the backstroke, many accomplished golfers have created it during the transition and/or
downswing.  When we talk about using this concept we are talking about golfers that are built to use Upper Torque.  These
are golfers that can easily rotate their just chest (thorax) at least 50 degrees without the hips turning.  These golfers can do
so without putting any undo stress on the spine.  During the swing these golfer feel like they are resisting with the lower
body and coiling the upper body.  Some golfers can only rotate the chest (thorax) a minimal amount without moving the hips,
say 25 degrees or less.  The golfers are what we call lower torque golfers.  They create the torque while turning their hips
generously in the backswing while feeling torque between the hips and ground.  Golfers that are able to turn the chest
(thorax) between 30-50 degrees fall into what we call the Full Torque option. These golfers turn their hips generously
however allow them to resist the coil of the upper body once the hips have reached the natural limit.  In a sense they are a
hybrid of the Upper and Lower torque options.  Ultimately these options have a profound influence on how we use torque in
the ground force pattern and using the option that fits your biomechanical design will allow you to accomplish that goal in a
more natural manner.
The sequences to the left shows the lower torque option as it
is applied during the backstroke.  Notice how the stomach
and chest seem to turn away from the address position at
nearly the same rate and degree.  The golfer's feet resist the
turn so that a significant amount of torque can develop in the
ground force pattern.  Due to that resistance the legs develop
a feel of torque as well.  As  the golfer completes the
backstroke the hips and chest feel like they've turned to
nearly the same degree.  In the pictures above EA Tischler is
flexible enough that his shoulders turn a little more than his
hips.  Even so he performed the action as a lower torque
action.  The additional upper body windup was due to his
biomechanical design having a Full Torque option.  Most
lower torque golfers are less flexible between the hips and
shoulders and therefore do best to maximize torque with the
lower body action.  By the top of the backstroke the lower
torque golfer's legs will feel tremendous resistance through
significant torque.
The sequences to the left shows the upper torque option as it is
applied during the backstroke.  The backstroke is performed with
a relatively quiet lower body.  From the address position the chest
(thorax) begins to coil above the resisting hips.  As the coiling
action continues the hips are pulled into action as soon as the
golfer reaches the natural differential between the upper body
and lower body.  In the middle picture the hips have only moved
slightly while the chest (thorax) has already turned about 45
degrees.  At the top of the backstroke the chest (thorax) has
turned more than 90 degrees while the hips have been pulled into
about a 45 degree angle.  Upper Torque golfers will turn the hips
a maximum of 45 degrees while the shoulders will turn a minimum
of 90 degrees.  This option requires extreme conditioning.  The
golfer must be both flexible enough and strong enough in the core
to perform the procedure.  It also helps if you have fast twitch
muscles to start the transition and forward swing.  Since the lower
body remains relatively in active, the forward motion must be jump
started, for lack of a better phrase.  However, if Upper Torque fits
you then you'll find the power you desire by resisting with the
lower body in the backswing followed by an action lower body in
the transition.
The sequences to the left shows the full torque option as it is
applied in the backstroke.  This options combines the two
previous options.  Resistance is felt in the feet as the hips turn,
however there is also a feel of the hips resisting to allow for coil
in the upper body.   When the hips reach their natural range of
motion the lower body develops significant torque.  The
shoulders continue to turn until they reach their full range of
motion and there is a significant separation between the angles
of the hips and shoulders at the top of the backstroke.  At the
top of the backstroke the hips will  turn at least 45 degrees and
the shoulders will turn at least an additional 45 degrees.   
Notice how you can see EA's back at the top of the swing.  You
can also see his hips have turned generously.  His legs also
feel very tight from being wound up.   This option, as with the
upper body option, requires tremendous strength and flexibility
with regard to the core muscles.  Keep in mind that only one of
the options fits your needs.  If you have short torso, or are
lacking either flexibility or strength in the core area, then you
will need to release some of the resistance and they find
another technique to help get more power out of your ground
force pattern.  the lower body torque option is probably fit for
your needs.
Clearing Action Biomechanics:
Front Hip, Tailbone, & Rear Hip options
As we begin to discuss the topic of clearing it seems appropriate to point out the it is a largely misunderstood concept.   Simply
put, clearing is the ability to transition in such a way to restore the postural alignments during the transition that you had at
address.  I like to call the process of clearing, "restoring."  This is because the body strives to restore its' address alignments
before the swing reaches the delivery point.  We will discuss this concept in detail throughout the series of Power of 3 Golf books
options of Front Hip, Center (Tailbone), and Rear Hip clearing actions.  Another way to describe clearing is the ability to make the
proper postural alignments during the transition that make room for the arms, hand and club to both Slot and Link up properly.  
Some golfers set-up to the ball with those angles establish, in those cases they are simply restoring the angles while clearing.  
Others set-up to the ball with a much taller posture and for them they need to create the postural angles during the transition, and
in that case they are actually clearing space.
(Left) We can view the Front Hip clearing option from the rear
view.  Notice how there is an orange stick marking the
position of the front hip at address.  As the golfer performs
the backstroke the hips turn and the front glute comes off the
stick. Then during the transition from backstroke to down
stroke the front hip rotates in such a way to push back onto
the stick "restoring" very close to its' initial alignment at
address.  As the stroke continues through impact the front
hip continues to stay pinned against the stick.  We often talk
about the golfer's rear end being up against a wall at
address, then it rotates off the wall in the backstroke,
followed by "restoring" onto the wall during the transition, and
finally the front hip continues to push up against, or in some
cases through the wall, during the impact interval.  The main
thing for front hip clear golfers to remember is that the front
hip is doing the work.
(Above) We can view the Front Hip clearing option from the down the line view.  Notice how there is an orange stick marking the position of the front hip at
address.  As the golfer performs the backstroke the hips turns and the front glute comes off the stick.  Then during the transition from backstroke to down
stroke the front hip rotates in such a way to push back onto the stick "restoring" very close to its' initial alignment at address.  As the stroke continues through
impact the front hip continues to stay pinned against the stick.  We often talk about the golfer's rear end being up against a wall at address, then it rotates off
the wall in the backstroke, followed by "restoring" onto the wall during the transition, and finally the front hip continues to push up against, or in some cases
through the wall, during the impact interval.  The main thing for front hip clear golfers to remember is that the front hip is doing the work of clearing.  From this
view we have added  blue line in the 2nd and 4th pictures. The line in the 2nd picture marks where the front hip has rotated to during the backstroke.  In picture
4 you can see  that the clearing of the front hip up against the stick, or imaginary wall, has made room for the rear hip to rotate inside the same mark during the
impact interval.  If the rear hip moves outside the mark, and closer to the ball, the stroke path will need to compensate. The path will either push out to the ball
causing a block, or the dreaded "shank," or the hands will flip the club in an effort to save the shot.  This last option causes hooks and pulls unless it is timed
with split second manipulation.  Keep in mind, since the rear end rotates off the wall during the backstroke it is very common for golfers to leave it off the wall
during the transition; thus failing to restore the proper postural alignments.  Failing to restore is a lazy move, however it is also an easy move.  Guard against it!
(Left) We can view the Center (Tailbone) clearing
option from the rear view.  Notice how there is an
orange stick marking the position of the tailbone at
address.  As the golfer performs the backstroke the
hips turn and the tailbone comes off the stick.  Then
during the transition from backstroke to down stroke
the tailbone rotates in such a way to push back onto
the stick "restoring" very close to its' initial alignment
at address.  We often talk about the golfer's rear end
being up against a wall at address, then it rotates off
the wall in the backstroke, followed by "restoring" onto
the wall during the transition.  The main thing for
tailbone clear golfers to remember is that the hips are
restoring the tailbone in a centered manner.
As the golfer performs the backstroke the hips turn in the manner that fits his biomechanics, then during, the transition from backstroke to down stroke the
tailbone rotates in such a way to push back onto the stick "restoring" very close to its' initial alignment at address.  We often talk about the golfer's rear end
being up against a wall at address, then it rotates off the wall in the backstroke, followed by "restoring" onto the wall during the transition.  The main thing for
tailbone clear golfers to remember is that the tailbone is doing the work of clearing.  From view we have added a blue line in the 2nd and 4th pictures. The line
in the 2nd picture marks where the front hip has rotated to during the backstroke.  In picture 4 you can see  that the clearing of the tailbone up against the
stick, or imaginary wall, has made room for the rear hip to rotate inside the same mark during the impact interval.  If the rear hip moves outside the mark, and
closer to the ball, the swing path will need to compensate. The swing path will either push out to the ball causing a block, or the dreaded "shank," or the hands
will flip the club in an effort to save the shot.  This last option causes hooks and pulls unless it is timed with split second manipulation.  Keep in mind, since the
rear end rotates off the wall during the backstroke it is very common for golfers to leave it off the wall during the transition; thus failing to restore the proper
postural alignments.  Failing to restore is a lazy move, however it is also an easy move.  So golfers often do so without knowing.
(Left) We can view the Rear Hip clearing option from the rear
view.  Notice how there is an orange stick marking the position
of the rear hip at address.  As the golfer performs the
backstroke the hips turn in the manner that keeps the rear hip
up against the stick.  Then during the transition from
backstroke to down stroke the rear glute stays on the stick and
then glides forward without rotating off the wall.  Notice how the
rear hip is on the wall at the top of the backstroke.  Therefore it
only needs to stay on the wall up until the swing reaches
delivery. As the stroke continues through impact the rear hip
rotates off the wall.  We often talk about the golfer's rear end
being up against a wall at address, then it rotates off the wall in
the backstroke, followed by "restoring" onto the wall during the
transition, and finally the rear hip continues to drive through
pushing the front hip up against wall during the impact interval.  
The main thing for rear hip clear golfers to remember is that the
rear hip does all the work during the clearing action.
Above we can view the Rear Hip clearing option from the rear view.  Notice how there is a orange stick marking the position of the rear hip at address.  As the golfer
performs the backstroke the hips turn in such a way that the rear glute stays up against the stick.  Then during the transition from backstroke to down stroke the
rear glute stays on the stick as the hips turn, then glides forward.  Notice how the rear hip is on the wall at the top of the backstroke.  Therefore it only needs to stay
on the wall long enough to reach a proper delivery alignment. As the stroke continues through impact the rear glute rotates off the wall, then the rear hip rotates
through impact.  We often talk about the golfer's rear end being up against a wall at address, then it rotates off the wall in the backstroke, followed by "restoring"
onto the wall during the transition, and finally the rear hip continues to drive through pushing the front hip up against wall during the impact interval.  The main thing
for rear hip clear golfers to remember is that the rear hip does all the work during the clearing action.  From view we have added a blue line in the 2nd and 4th
pictures. The line in the 2nd picture marks where the front hip has rotated to during the backstroke.  In picture 4 you can see  that the clearing of the rear hip drives
through in such a way to move straight toward where the front hip was in picture 2. We can see the rear hip up against the stick, or imaginary wall,  in picture 2.  The
rear hip clearing action has pushed the rear end back up against the wall in picture 3, and the rear hip is moving into position to replace the front hip in picture 4.  
This clearing action has made room for the rear hip to rotate inside the mark during the impact interval.  If the rear hip moves outside the mark and closer to the
ball, the stroke path will need to compensate. The path will either push out to the ball  causing a block or the dreaded "shank," or the hands will flip the club in an
effort to save the shot.  This last option causes hooks and pulls unless it is timed with split second manipulation.  Keep in mind, since the rear end rotates off the
wall during the backstroke it is very common for golfers to leave it off the wall during the transition; thus failing to restore the proper postural alignments.  Failing to
restore is a lazy move, however it is also an easy move.  So golfers often do so without knowing.
Axis of Symmetry Biomechanics:
Sternum Line, Center Line, & Spine Line options
As with the Clearing Options, Axis of Symmetry Options are also very misunderstood.  In traditional teaching the spine is often
talked about as the axis of symmetry of rotation for the upper body.  In reality there are 3 different options for the upper body's
axis of symmetry.  We call these three options the Spine Line, the Center Line, and the Spine Line.  With the proper primary
and secondary tilt alignments established and maintained all three axis' can be used with proper posturing being maintained.  
Keep in mind that the axis lines we are talking about are not actually physical axis lines. However, when the stroke is
performed properly these images help us understand why the golfers upper body rotates the way it does.
(Left) We can see the Sternum Line option from the front view. This option
is largely misunderstood because it is mistaken as a reverse pivot action.  
However, as you can see the golfer sets up with sufficient secondary spine
tilt and maintains that tilt while rotating precisely in posture around the
sternum line. Another physical issue that makes the illusion of a reverse
pivot is the manner in which the spine twists. The lower vertebrae only bend
side to side of front to back without significant torque. The upper vertebrae
however are designed to bend and twist. So, as the upper vertebrae twist
the top of the spine often torques rearward making the illusion of a reverse
pivot. In the pictures above we can see that with proper postural alignments
the golfer can still use the sternum as the axis of symmetry. The orange line
shows a relatively vertical axis marking the where the axis line would be
without secondary spine tilt.  Once secondary spine tilt is established the
sternum line becomes the axis of symmetry at setup. The black line shows
the spine angle at address, as marked from the sternum to the center of
the hips. As the torso rotates it pivots around that line. The yellow line
designates the spine line at the top of the backstroke. Notice how the black
line and yellow line are parallel to each other showing that the proper
postural angles are maintained. The blue line marks the actual outside of
the hip line showing that the hips rotate in posture without reverse pivoting
or swaying.
(Left) We can see the Sternum Line option from the rear view. This option
is largely misunderstood because it is mistaken as a reverse pivot action.  
However, as you can see the golfer sets up with sufficient secondary spine
tilt and maintains that tilt while rotating precisely in posture around the
sternum line. Another physical issue that makes the illusion of a reverse
pivot is the manner in which the spine twists. The lower vertebrae only bend
side to side of front to back without significant torque. The upper vertebrae
however are designed to bend and twist. So, as the upper vertebrae twist
the top of the spine often torques rearward making the illusion of a reverse
pivot. In the pictures above we can see that with proper postural alignments
the golfer can still use the sternum as the axis of symmetry. The orange line
shows a relatively vertical axis marking the where the axis line would be
without secondary spine tilt.  Once secondary spine tilt is established the
sternum line becomes the axis of symmetry at setup. The black line shows
the spine angle at address, as marked from the top of the spine through
the center of the hips. As the torso rotates it pivots around that line. The
yellow line designates the spine line at the top of the backstroke. Notice
how the spine line is the black line at address and moves to the yellow line
at the top of the backstroke.  You can see that action has been performed
around the sternum line.  Also, notice how the black line and yellow line are
parallel to each other showing that the proper postural angles are
maintained. The blue line marks the actual outside of the hip line showing
that the hips rotate in posture without reverse pivoting or swaying.
(Left) We can view the Center Line as the Axis of Symmetry. This time
we are viewing it from the face on view. The pictures above are of a
center anchor center line axis of symmetry pattern. With this in mind
there is less secondary tilt than in other patterns. Even so, there is still
enough secondary tilt to satisfy proper posturing. The black line marks
the actual axis of symmetry.  Notice how the stroke rotates around this
axis up to the top of the backstroke. As the action is performed to the
top of the backstroke we can see that the spine line (the orange line)
moves to the right of the black line and the sternum line (the blue line)
moves to the left of the black line.  Therefore, the only axis line that
remains constant as this action is performed is the center line.  Golfers
performing the center line option often have a moderate amount of
secondary tilt.  Because of that they are told they have insufficient
secondary spine tilt.  In reality, as long as you have secondary spine
tilt and it is maintained then you are performing with sufficient postural
alignments.  Even so, I would recommend you establish a little more
secondary tilt to be on the safe side.  Nevertheless, if you find that only
a moderate amount of secondary tilt works for your needs, then stick
with it.
(Left) We can view the Center Line as the Axis of Symmetry. This
time we are viewing it from the rear view. The pictures above are of
a center anchor center line axis of symmetry pattern. With this in
mind there is less secondary tilt than in other patterns. Even so,
black line marks the actual axis of symmetry.  Notice how the stroke
rotates around this axis up to the top of the  backstroke. As the
action is performed to the top of the backstroke we can see that the
spine line (the orange line) moves to the right of the black line and
the sternum line (the blue line) moves to the left of the black line.  
Therefore, the only axis line that remains constant as this action is
performed is the center line.  Golfers performing the center line
option often have a moderate amount of secondary tilt.  Because of
that they are told they have insufficient secondary spine tilt.  In
reality, as long as you have secondary spine tilt and it is maintained
then you are performing with sufficient postural alignments.  Even
so, I would recommend you establish a little more secondary tilt to
be on the safe side.  Nevertheless, if you find that only a moderate
amount of secondary tilt works for your needs, then stick with it.
The last option is the Spine Line options. This is the more traditional
view of the axis of symmetry. Above we are viewing it from the rear
view. Once again notice how the black line marks the axis of
symmetry. As the stroke moves to the top of the backstroke the
torso turns around this axis. We can see at the top of the backstroke
that the black line matches the spine line showing that it truly was
performed as a spine line axis of symmetry stroke.  We can also see
that the sternum line (yellow line) shifts as the stroke moves to the
top of the backstroke.  In all three options we can see that the torso
rotated around the black line as the axis of symmetry. In the sternum
line option the black line starts on and is still aligned on the sternum
at the top of the backstroke. In the center line option the black line
starts on and stays on the center line of the torso. In the spine line
option the black line starts on and stays on the spine line to the top
of the backstroke. The sternum line option is easily viewed and
understood from the face on view, the spine line option is easily
viewed and understood from the rear view, and the center line
option is easily viewed from either the face on or the rear view.
Sternum Line Axis of Symmetry Option:
Tailbone Clear Option:
Front Hip Clear Option:
Full Torque Option:
Upper Torque Option:
Lower Torque Option:
Front Anchor - Post - Pelvic Pivot Axis Option:
Center Anchor - Post - Pelvic Pivot Axis Option:
Rear Anchor- Post- Pelvic Pivot Axis Option:
Power  Golf
Related To The Fundamentals of Power
B  I  O  M  E  C  H  A  N  I  C  S
3
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As a reminder, the Power of 3 Golf Biomechanics related to Power:

Swing Anchor – Posting - Pelvic Pivot Axis - Addresses the 3 options for pivoting the pelvis in a
balanced manner.
Torque System – Addresses the 3 options the identify how golfers create separation between the
upper and lower body actions and how they apply torque.
Clearing Action – Addresses the 3 options of restoring your postural alignments during the transition.
Axis of Symmetry – Addresses the 3 options for the axises of upper body (torso) rotation.


As mentioned above there are 3 options for each feature.  The options for the biomechanics related to
the fundamentals of power are listed below.

Power of 3 Golf Biomechanics related to Power:

Swing Anchor - Posting - Pelvic Pivot AxisFront Hip, Center of Gravity, & Rear Hip
Torque SystemLower Body, Full Body, & Upper Body
Clearing ActionFront Hip, Tailbone, & Rear Hip
Axis of SymmetrySternum Line, Center Line, & Spine Line
Keep in mind these descriptions are offered as a general overview.  For further
explanations, ways of testing your body mechanics, and to study applications you can
study the Secrets of Owning Your Swing book series.
Keep in mind these descriptions are offered as a general overview.  For further
explanations, ways of testing your body mechanics, and to study applications you can
study the Secrets of Owning Your Swing book series.
Keep in mind these descriptions are offered as a general overview.  For further
explanations, ways of testing your body mechanics, and to study applications you can
study the Secrets of Owning Your Swing book series.
The last option is the Spine Line options. This is the more
traditional view of the axis of symmetry. Above we are viewing it
from the face on view. Once again notice how the black line
marks the axis of symmetry. As the stroke moves to the top of
the backstroke the torso turns around this axis. We can see at
the top of the backstroke that the black line matches the spine
line showing that it truly was performed as a spine line axis of
symmetry stroke.  We can also see the though the overlay
matches the sternum line at address, the sternum line (yellow
line) shifts as the stroke moves to the top of the backstroke.  In
all three options we can see that the torso rotated around the
black line as the axis of symmetry. In the sternum line option the
black line starts on and is still aligned on the sternum at the top
of the backstroke. In the center line option the black line starts
on and stays on the center line of the torso. In the spine line
option the black line starts on and stays on the spine line to the
top of the backstroke. The sternum line option is easily viewed
and understood from the face on view, the spine line option is
easily viewed and understood from the rear view, and the
center line option is easily viewed from either the face on or the
rear view.
Keep in mind these descriptions are offered as a general overview.  For further
explanations, ways of testing your body mechanics, and to study applications you can
study the Secrets of Owning Your Swing book series.
On this page we will overview the 4 Biomechanical features related  to Power, and that means we will be addressing
the 4 structural influences that relate to the body.  Study these features and familiarize yourself with the 3 options
related to each feature.  Simply familiarize yourself with the basic patterns.  If you are interested in studying them in
more detail you can purchase the Secrets Of Owning Your Swing book series.  That series discusses the topics in
more detail and includes was of screening and applying the information learned through the screenings.  You can also
click on the BioSwing Dynamics logo in the top left corner of this page to get to the BioSwing Dynamics page which
has more information about biomechanics and your golf swing.